What is EPI-743?

If you follow us on Facebook (YOU REALLY SHOULD!), then you’ve seen our recent updates and photographs from the National Institutes of Health where Katherine started the clinical trial for EPI-743. I know how confusing this information may seem if you are not living it, so I’m sharing basic Q & A below from the United Mitochondrial Disease Foundation. (It took us a while to figure out that the “EPI” part of this trial drug name is the acronym for the manufacturer, Edison Pharmaceuticals Inc.)

What is EPI-743?
EPI-743 is a small molecule drug that is currently in clinical trials in the United States and Europe. EPI-743 was recently granted orphan drug designation by the FDA to treat patients who are seriously ill and have inherited mitochondrial respiratory chain disorders. EPI-743 works by improving the regulation of cellular energy metabolism by targeting an enzyme NADPH quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1).

How is it given?
EPI-743 is administered orally or through a gastrostomy tube.

How was EPI-743 discovered?
EPI-743 was discovered and developed by Edison Pharmaceuticals by using a technique called high throughput screening. Edison evaluated thousands of chemicals that target cellular electron handling, and finally selected EPI-743 based on its ability to work, be orally absorbed, and its safety.

Why can’t my doctor just prescribe EPI-743?
EPI-743 is an experimental drug. It cannot be prescribed yet because the FDA does not approve it. Access can only be obtained through clinical trial enrollment. Results will be closely monitored at specified enrollment sites, under the direction of clinical research investigators.

Are there additional clinical sites being established?
Additional trial sites are being established in Europe, Japan, and in North America. (http://www.umdf.org/atf/cf/%7B858ACD34-ECC3-472A-8794-39B92E103561%7D/EPI.PDF)

In a nutshell, EPI-743 is the closest thing to hope available (through clinical trial) in treatment form. Mitochondrial dysfunction is linked to many neurological diseases such as Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, ALS, and other diseases like diabetes and some cancers, so this research is important for so many.

I first heard about this trial in September 2013 – just two days after we received Katherine’s first misdiagnosis for Infantile Neuroaxonal Dystrophy (INAD) – when Dave told me he found a trial that might be our only hope. He called the NIH directly and asked how we could get in the study. At the time we didn’t even know much about INAD or if it was even categorized as a “mitochondrial” disease, but Dave left no stone unturned. Fast forward to 2015 and a few months after Whole-Exome Sequencing (WES) results confirmed Katherine’s true diagnosis – NUBPL, Mitochondrial Complex 1 Deficiency. Dave’s early contact with the study (we were told EPI-743 wasn’t even in the building when he called that day) put us next in line when an opening became available in August 2015.

Once again we are reminded of the crucial role we play in advocating for our daughter. Nobody was going to make that call for us and ask how we could get our child on the list for the trial. YOU HAVE TO PICK UP THE PHONE AND DO IT YOURSELF. Thankfully, in our case, Dave did just that.IMG_8597As always, Katherine was a trooper. Before starting the drug (placebo or EPI-743 – it’s a double-blind study so she will get six months of EPI-743 and six months of a placebo with a two month washout in between), a variety of tests had to be performed to establish a baseline.
IMG_8609IMG_8642Between needle pokes, a neuropsychological evaluation, and an EKG and Echocardiogram, Katherine enjoyed playing at The Children’s Inn at NIH. She loved the many playgrounds, art camp, therapy dog, family dinners, and being around other children.IMG_8601IMG_8647We have a fridge full of EPI-743 or placebo vials and hope it will reverse or stop the progression of her disease. Only time will tell. In the meantime, we are moving forward.

Katherine starts pre-K this Thursday where she will receive speech therapy, occupational therapy, physical therapy, and water (aqua) therapy. Like everything, school will be a transitional time, so we are focused on making her life as “normal” and routine as possible. We go back to the NIH in early September, with follow-up lab work done here at home in between visits.
IMG_8653As for me? Besides looking for other NUBPL patients around the globe and running our NUBPL Foundation, I am looking forward to some much needed time for myself. As a constant caregiver, it is time that I take better care of myself, starting with a fancy new hairstyle that I might have time to recreate like my hair dresser (not likely). I am looking forward to the future once again and see great things to come on the horizon.

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