Tag Archives: Spooner Girl Foundation

Two NUBPL Families Meet For First Time, 2,000 miles apart

A little over two years ago, we received Katherine’s results for Whole Exome Sequencing (WES), giving us a name, NUBPL, to the disease that was a mystery to her doctors and is responsible for the atrophy of her cerebellum. Although we finally knew the name of the mutated gene, and that it was considered a rare form of Mitochondrial Complex 1 Deficiency, we didn’t know much more than that. In fact, at the time we quickly learned that her disease was recently discovered.

Although we were elated to receive a diagnosis, we realized that we didn’t know how the disease would affect Katherine’s life. Her doctor had never seen another patient with NUBPL, so he didn’t have much to tell us in terms of disease progression.

We searched the Internet looking for any information we could find, which included a couple of scientific articles citing six patients from 5 unrelated families. From these articles, we learned more about the patients, including sex, age, country of origin, clinical signs, MRI details, when and if they walked independently, and cognitive function. We had no way of contacting any of these families without knowing their names or doctors. We didn’t even have a photograph.

I felt like a detective scouring the Internet hoping to find a clue. I started tagging everything we shared with “NUBPL” and searched the Internet several times a day for a signal from anyone out there who had this disease. I posted in Facebook groups and wrote blog posts, anything I could think of that might put us in contact with another family with this same disease.

Just a few weeks later, I was looking through posts on the Global Genes Facebook page when I noticed a post from a mom sharing a link to a documentary about their 14-year journey to a diagnosis for both her daughters who were diagnosed with NUBPL. As I watched the documentary, tears rolled down my face as I picked up the phone to call Dave to tell him I’d found another family. And that they looked happy and one was walking independently. After living with a misdiagnosis for nearly two years of a quickly fatal disease, I’ll never forget the moment that I saw the smiling face of a 16-year old girl with same disease as Katherine.

Everything is about perspective in this life. After being told that my child was going to die by the age of seven, that first glimpse at Cali Spooner’s face added  years to my child’s life. In her photograph I saw Katherine smiling back at the camera. For the first time, I saw Katherine as a teenager.

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And then I saw Ryaan Spooner’s face and recognized my Katherine in her as well. And she could walk independently. Their body types were even similar.

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The Spooner Family

I got off the phone with Dave and contacted their mom, Cristy, who responded immediately and we’ve been in contact ever since. She put us in touch with their doctor at UC-Irvine, Dr. Virginia Kimonis, who was growing fibroblasts to learn more about the disease. We contacted Dr. Kimonis and sent Katherine’s skin biopsy for research.

Last week, our family traveled to California to attend the first NUBPL Family Conference at UC-Irvine and to spend time with the Spooner Family.

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We heard from several researchers and toured the lab where they have been growing our daughter’s fibroblasts.

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And a few days later, we were able to introduce our girls to one another for the very first time.

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Both of our families instantly hit it off as we watched our girls play together. We were all sad that the night had to end and we had to go back to living on opposite coasts.

Katherine and Ryaan share a love of dolls and both are fiercely determined and independent. They are very similar in many ways. Katherine watched Ryaan walk independently, which she learned to do at Katherine’s age (they are two years apart). After seeing Ryaan walking, Katherine is now determined more than ever that she’s going to do the same. And I know she will.

Our girls are three of 11 NUBPL patients identified in the world. After spending time with The Spooner Family, I am reassured more than ever that we will find more NUBPL families in the future. These things take time and we are just getting started.

We are two families brought together through science, hope, love, and a fierce determination to give our girls the best chance possible at life. Where science hasn’t caught up, we will fund the research ourselves through our non-profits. Where there are barriers to diagnosing more patients in the future, we will spend our time to eliminate those barriers. And when we cannot find those patients as they are diagnosed, we will do everything we can to make sure they can find us.

As our families were spending time together in California, a mom with two daughters made contact with both of us. Yes, I am hopeful that we will grow our NUBPL community.

2016 Rare Disease Day $1 Challenge

We all live a life that can never be fully conveyed through social media – a world we see daily that cannot be shared or adequately described through five second sound bites or a quick snapshot. These moments are felt and lived, not shown and told.

I give you countless examples and observations, but I know I always fall short in my depiction. At the end of the day, all I have is a promise to myself and my daughter. It’s easy to tell myself I’m doing enough, and I am in the normal world, but nothing about our journey is “normal.”

We must push forward and harness the scientific possibilities for treatment beyond clinical trial drugs and therapy. We are growing Katherine’s stem cells and raising money to fund NUBPL research. Advances are being made daily and we need to fuel it. This is what I mean by not giving up.

I fight a daily battle on the home front, which is mighty enough, but there’s a larger war beyond our doorstep that, if won, can ease the struggles of all of our personal fights.

This is what ‪#‎Hope4KB‬ means to me.

February 29th is Rare Disease Day 2016 – just 55 days away. Each year we try to do something special to raise awareness. Last year we sold #Hope4KB t-shirts and asked that you wear them on Rare Disease Day. We raised $2700 for rare disease.

Our $1 challenge for 2016 is simple:

  1. SHARE this post; and
  2. Challenge yourself to donate just $1 (or more) to one of the following: Hope for Katherine Belle or The Spooner Girl Foundation. Our daughter’s disease is called NUBPL and has been linked to Parkinson’s Disease. (Click here for the full bio of lead researcher, Dr. Virginia Kimonos.) All donations will directly go to NUBPL research, treatment, and hopefully, a CURE! It is amazing how much can add up if everyone gives just a little.

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